What is the Application Process for Medicaid?

This is a general guide to the Medicaid application process. Be sure to contact your local Medicaid office for state-specific rules.

Note: Your Medicaid office may be called the Department of Health, the Department of Social Services, the Department of Insurance, or another name.

  • Contact your local Medicaid office to ask how you need to submit your application. Some states require you to apply in person, while others may allow you to apply by mail, online, by telephone, or at locations in the community, such as health centers and community organizations.
  • Find out which documents and forms of identification you may need in order to apply. Your Medicaid office may ask you to show the following:
    • Proof of date of birth (e.g., birth certificate)
    • Proof U.S. citizenship or lawful residence (e.g., passport, drivers license, birth certificate, green card, employment authorization card)
    • Proof of all types of income earned and unearned (e.g., paycheck stubs, retirement benefits, Supplemental Security Income)
    • Proof of resources (e.g., bank or stock statements, life insurance policies, property)
    • Proof of residence (e.g., rent receipt, landlord statement, deed)
    • Medicare card and any other insurance cards (you can also provide a copy of the insurance policy)

Note: Medicaid coverage is available, regardless of citizenship status, if you are pregnant or require treatment for an emergency medical condition. A doctor must certify that you are pregnant or had an emergency, and you must meet all other eligibility requirements.

Troubleshooting

  • If you have any problems applying at a Medicaid office, ask to speak with a supervisor.
  • If you do not receive a timely decision on your Medicaid application or are turned down for Medicaid, you can appeal by asking for a state fair hearing (not a city or local one). Check with your Medicaid office to learn more about requesting a fair hearing.
  • Once you have Medicaid, you must recertify (show that you remain eligible for Medicaid) to continue to get Medicaid coverage. When you submit your Medicaid application, be sure to ask when and how you will need to recertify. In many states, recertification is an annual process.

Read Next: What is the Eligibility for Medicaid When I Have Medicare Part D?
Learn About: How Do I Use Extra Help to Eliminate my Part D LEP?
Return to: Medicare Admin

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